Patchouli: head east for a magical scent

These days, you don't need long hair to wear patchouli. Back in the late 1960s, hippies doused themselves with this exotic scent, no doubt drawn to its Eastern heritage and reputation as an aphrodisiac. The fragrance of the “Summer of Love” originally spread around the world rolled up inside Turkish and Persian rugs. Carpet makers would add dried patchouli leaves for their moth-repelling qualities and the perfume soon became associated with affluence.

Today, the distinctive earthy fragrance continues to have sensuous associations. Find out more about this incredible scent below.


Patchouli
Patchouli oil

Herbal versatility

A member of the mint family, patchouli grows in warm Asian climates. The leaves have been used in traditional folk remedies across the region. It not only makes for a nice scent, it can be used as an effective mosquito repellent too. Just dilute five drops of the essential oil in half a litre of water and spray.

With age comes strength

We all know that patchouli has a strong fragrance, but this isn't apparent when you sniff the leaves on a bush. According to health experts, the scent develops during a slow process of oxidation. So, patchouli improves with age — like all the best people.

Uplifting aroma

Give yourself a boost by adding a few drops of patchouli oil to water in a diffuser with a tea candle. Aromatherapists claim that not only can the rich, spicy smell make you feel happier, it’s also reputed to be an aphrodisiac. Lifting your mood can also have a positive knock-on effect on your physical disposition; you may hold yourself more upright or have a sparkle in your eye.

Everyday Comfort

Using Comfort Upllifting Fabric Conditioner in your wash is an easy way to wear a patchouli-inspired scent and reap some of its amazing benefits. Not only will your clothes smell gorgeous all day, but patchouli's reputed amorous qualities could give your confidence a boost. Try it when you're washing bedding!


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